AC repair inShellman Bluff, GA

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As a homeowner, you know that your HVAC unit is one of the most important components in your house. It keeps you cool during hot summer days and warm on chilly winter nights. When it’s working properly, it’s easy to forget its important role in your everyday life. But when it malfunctions, you quickly remember how crucial heating and AC repair in Shellman Bluff, GA, is for your family.

At Liberty Heating & Airworx AC, our mission is to ensure your cooling and heating systems remain effective throughout the year at the lowest prices available. Unlike some of our competitors, we prefer to put our customers first before anything else. We believe in doing right by the folks who choose our business. Cutting corners to save a few bucks? Annoying sales pitches to try and sell you new parts or equipment? That’s just not the way we do business.

When you choose Liberty Heating & Airworx AC, you can rest easy knowing you won’t have to pay outlandish fees for our services. As a licensed, bonded heating and air conditioning company, we know how important trust is when it comes to the nature of our business. We go above and beyond other HVAC companies and treat your home like it was our own. That way, you have peace of mind knowing you and your family are in capable, responsible hands.

We take pride in providing our customers with the highest quality service. Our highly trained technicians have experience handling all aspects of HVAC repair, from routine maintenance problems to advanced A/C unit installation projects in Shellman Bluff, GA.

Through hard work, honesty, and integrity, we have built a loyal customer base that continues to grow each month. It would be our honor to call you our customer too. Whether you need a routine maintenance check or emergency heater repair in Shellman Bluff, we are here for you every step of the way, 24-hours a day.

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Why Choose Liberty Heating & Airworx AC?

We get it – there are a lot of A/C companies out there to sift through. You want to be sure you choose the best company for your needs and budget.

Why-Choose-Liberty-Heating

Here are just a few reasons why our customers choose Liberty Heating & Airworx AC over other HVAC companies in South Georgia:

Authorized Carrier and Goodman Dealer:

Authorized Carrier and Goodman Dealer:

We’re authorized to service and sell two of the most respected brands in the heating and A/C industry. No matter what size home you own, our technicians are fully equipped to handle any HVAC issue with your Goodman, Carrier, or other air conditioning units.

Insured, Bonded, and Licensed:

Insured, Bonded, and Licensed:

We go the extra mile to ensure that our customers feel safe and protected when they hire our team. We treat your home like it was our own, from the moment we step foot on your property to the time we pull out of your driveway.

Fair Pricing

Fair Pricing

We understand that money doesn’t just grow on trees. You work hard to make an honest living and need reasonable pricing on A/C repair and other HVAC services. At Liberty Heating & Airworx AC, you’ll never have to worry about us charging you outrageous prices.

Flexible Financing

Flexible Financing

Has your heater gone out in the middle of a freezing January night? A/C unit quit working in the middle of summer? Despite some common red flags that you can keep an eye out for, you can never really plan for an HVAC malfunction. That’s why we offer emergency HVAC services in Shellman Bluff, 24-hours a day, seven days a week.

Year-Round Discounts

Year-Round Discounts

With Ft. Stewart just a few minutes away, Shellman Bluff has one of Georgia’s largest active military populations. It is our honor to offer current and retired military members and their families discounted prices on their next service appointment. We also offer up to 10% off for Federal Law Enforcement Training Center Members. It’s our small way of giving back to those who have sacrificed so much for our liberty.

Free Estimates

Free Estimates

From new unit installations to air conditioning repair, it would be our pleasure to provide you with a free estimate on our services.

Emergency Service

Emergency Service

Has your heater gone out in the middle of a freezing January night? A/C unit quit working in the middle of summer? Despite some common red flags that you can keep an eye out for, you can never really plan for an HVAC malfunction. That’s why we offer emergency HVAC services in Shellman Bluff, 24-hours a day, seven days a week.

Flexible Financing

Flexible Financing:

When your A/C unit or heater breaks suddenly, it can be hard to squeeze repairs into your budget. To make sure all of our customers are comfortable in their homes, we offer financing options to make your life easier.

Air Conditioning Repair in Shellman Bluff, GA

Here in southern Georgia, our summers can be extremely hot and humid. Trying to live in a home without A/C a South Georgia summer isn’t just a bad idea; it can be downright deadly. Fortunately, Liberty Heating & Airworx AC is here to help with all of your A/C needs. There’s no A/C issue that our highly trained HVAC technicians haven’t seen before, and no job too small or large for us to tackle. Whether your A/C system needs a basic issue resolved, or you need a new AC unit installed at your house, our team will be at your door in no time.

We have the experience and training to service all major air conditioning systems, from ductless systems to central air setups. We’re authorized to service Goodman to Carrier brands, but the truth is it doesn’t matter what A/C unit brand you have – our team can fix it all. If your unit is beyond repair, we can walk you through the process of installing a new A/C system and suggest appropriate units that will work well for your home.

Here are just a few of the most common A/C repair services we offer in Shellman Bluff and the surrounding area:

  • Electrical repair
  • Compressor Repair
  • Refrigerant Leaks
  • Refrigerant Recharges
  • Replace Blower Motor

Common Signs That
You Need AC Repair in
Shellman Bluff, GA

Once springtime rolls around, it’s very important that you keep your eyes and ears open for any potential warning signs that your A/C unit needs to be repaired. The last thing you need is to be caught off guard when June, July, and August are in full swing. Knowledge is power, and at Liberty Heating & Airworx AC, committed to keeping our customers in the loop about potential A/C repair warning signs. That way, you can take preventative steps rather than reactive ones.

Loud-Unusual-Noises
Loud, Unusual Noises

Don’t be alarmed if your A/C unit makes low-level noises throughout the day and night – these sounds are completely normal. However, if you hear loud, unusually abrupt noises coming from your unit, it may be time to have it repaired. Buzzing or rattling noises can mean a part is loose, while grinding or whistling can signal a more serious problem. Because these types of issues won’t work themselves out on their own, a professional is needed to diagnose and correct the problem.

Strong-Odors
Strong Odors

If you notice strange, smelly odors permeating throughout your home, your first instinct may be to grab the air freshener. However, unpleasant odors can be a sign that your A/C unit needs attention. Our A/C repair techs will let you know what’s going on and how a potential issue can be remediated with a quick diagnostic test.

Refrigerant or Water Leaks
Refrigerant or Water Leaks

Your A/C unit needs refrigerant to keep your home cool and comfortable when it’s hot outside. It’s common for condensation to accumulate as your system cools your home. With that said, if you notice pooling water or an active leak coming from your A/C system, it’s time to call an A/C repair tech ASAP. Leaks can cause extensive damage to your home, and the problem needs to be addressed quickly.

Heater Repair in
Shellman Bluff, GA

South Georgia isn’t known for its freezing temperatures, but one thing is for sure – wintertime in Shellman Bluff can get very cold. When the temps begin to drop, your home’s furnace works properly. Modern homes have come a long way since the days of wood and coal. Your home’s heater is complicated, and when one component fails, the entire system can be affected. In situations like these, it’s important not to panic. Instead, give Liberty Heating & Airworx AC a call. Our trustworthy team of heating repair experts have the knowledge and training to repair your furnace fast, so you can get back to enjoying your home.

Here are just a few of the most common issues that we can help repair:

  • No Heat
  • Thermostat Malfunction
  • Heat Pump Replacement
  • Ignition and Pilot Problems
  • Noisy Heater
  • Emergency Services
  • Much More!

Common Signs That You Need Furnace Repair in Shellman Bluff, GA

Common Signs That You Need Furnace Repair in Shellman Bluff, GA

Today’s heating systems are complex. At Liberty Heating & Airworx AC, our heating repair technicians receive ongoing training in all aspects of heating technology. That way, their skills stay sharp, and their techniques remain up to date. However, you don’t need to be an expert to spot common signs that your heater may need to be repaired.

As colder months approach in Georgia, try to be aware of the following red flags:

Expensive Heating Bill

You’re probably used to a more expensive electricity bill when winter hits Shellman Bluff. However, if you notice a huge price jump over last year’s bill, it could be a sign that something is wrong with your heating system. Utility companies are known for raising prices gradually, but a dramatic leap is a cause for concern.

Uneven Heating
Uneven-Heating

Does your heater seem to work perfectly in some areas of your house but not others? Are some rooms too hot while others are drafty and cold? If so, your heater may need repairing. This is a common issue in older homes and requires an expert to inspect your heater and ducts for airflow problems.

Unhealthy Air Quality
Unhealthy Air Quality

If the air in your house is hazy no matter how much you dust, your heater may be the problem. A furnace that circulates mildew, dust, and other harmful particles isn’t working correctly. This issue is particularly bad for people with asthma or respiratory illnesses. If you haven’t changed your home’s air filter recently, be sure to do so. If the problem persists, it’s time to call Liberty Heating & Airworx AC.

New AC Installation
in Shellman Bluff, GA

You and your family depend on your home’s A/C system to keep you cool and comfortable during the hottest months of the year. Unfortunately, breakdowns happen at the worst possible times – like in the middle of July when temperatures are over 90 degrees. If you have had to repair your A/C system more and more often, investing in a new cooling system will save you time and money in the long run.

As an Authorized Carrier and Goodman dealer – two of the most recognized and respected brands in our industry – we have the highest quality units available. We handle every aspect of your new A/C installation from start to finish. That way, you can focus on living your life rather than worrying about the next time your A/C goes out.

Curious when it might be time for a new A/C system?

Keep an eye out for these warning signs:

Dusty Furniture

Dusty Furniture

If you have kept your unit well-maintained and changed your air filter regularly, you shouldn’t experience this problem. If you do, and your system is old, it can be more cost-effective to replace it and have your duct system analyzed to fix the root cause of your dust issue.

High Humidity

High Humidity

If it feels unusually sticky in your home, like you just spent a few hours outside in the summertime, there’s a good chance that something is seriously wrong with your air conditioning. Your air conditioner’s job is to pull moisture out of the air to keep your feeling cool inside. When that process fails, it can increase your risk of mold and mildew growth – and that’s just the start.

Frequent Repairs

Frequent Repairs

When your repair bills end up costing more than a down payment on a new A/C system, it might make more financial sense to invest in a more modern unit. Compare how much it costs to have our maintenance technicians perform regular service vs. the cost of a new air conditioning installation. The results may surprise you.

Liberty Heating & Airworx AC

We Are Your Trusted Local Source For Heating And Air Conditioning Services

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912-408-3131

Latest News in Shellman Bluff

Off the coast, the word is ‘Shhhh’

SHELLMAN BLUFF - If there’s a place where “Keep this a secret’’ comes to mind, it’s the Georgia coast, strung with barrier islands as big as Bermuda, and back islands - 1,600 of them - as large as hundreds of acres to the size of a pickup truck. To find so many wildly beautiful islands in one state is remarkable enough, but it’s the fishing that draws anglers here.Around and between the islands, a mighty 8-foot tide flushes 378,000 acres of salt marsh with brackish, food-rich water: the chemistry of...

SHELLMAN BLUFF - If there’s a place where “Keep this a secret’’ comes to mind, it’s the Georgia coast, strung with barrier islands as big as Bermuda, and back islands - 1,600 of them - as large as hundreds of acres to the size of a pickup truck. To find so many wildly beautiful islands in one state is remarkable enough, but it’s the fishing that draws anglers here.

Around and between the islands, a mighty 8-foot tide flushes 378,000 acres of salt marsh with brackish, food-rich water: the chemistry of a great fishery. In May schools of 60 to 100 redfish start cruising the mud banks. In June, tarpon over 100 pounds roll a boat-length away. Tripletail, a fine fighting and dinner table fish, lie inches below the surface, and a kingdom of critters, from snowy egrets to wild boar, join in the feed. “It’s the last East Coast outback,’’ says Steve Holley, a tournament sportsman who manages a fishing camp here.

My family and I loaded up the car and headed to Holley’s neighborhood, the Bluffs: Shellman, Contentment, Pleasure, and Dallas bluffs, to name a few. On a coast known for fishing, the unincorporated speck north of Brunswick is one of three hot spots. Although resorts and mega-yacht marinas have yet to find the Bluffs, Georgians have fished here for over a century. At Contentment Bluff run by Holley, they rent the circa 1930s cabins or spend weekends in trailers with gleaming center-consoles in tow.

In Shellman Bluff Lin Rogers poured a Jim Beam and soda and handed us the keys to Moonpie Cottage. Rogers, who drives a 1998 Cadillac DeVille with 81,000 miles on it and a golf cart with twice that, manages the area’s best portfolio of vacation rentals, ranging from Airstreams to designer homes.

On the water, the Bluffs rise out of the spartina grass on the Julienton and Broro rivers. While my family slept in, I took my first tidewater turn, sight-fishing for reds, with Captain Scott Dykes and his friend Ronnie Chambers. A lemon sun rose as we pulled away from “downtown’’ Shellman’s waterfront of boat lifts and the Shellman Fish Camp store, where a Coke costs 60 cents. Due east, Sapelo Sound stretched emptily. A hard current dragged the buoys, and brown, detritus-rich creeks snaked in dizzying array.

“Let’s try 153,’’ said Dykes, referring to an Intracoastal Waterway marker. A good 60 hungry redfish schooled alongside the bank, too big for keepers but great sport. Next we nudged against a mud flat Dykes had recently discovered and cast to the fish moving toward us, their tails flashing above the shallow water's surface as they grubbed the bottom for food.

On the west side of Sapelo Island, we poled into a beauty spot like an enchanted glen. Locally known as “the Chocolate House,’’ its name comes from a remnant visible from the water of the 18th-century Chocolate Plantation, whose main house, commissary, barn, and slave huts are among the largest examples on the Georgia coast of tabby construction (a centuries-old material made from equal parts lime, water, sand, oyster shells, and ash). Close by were 4,000-year-old shell rings left by Paleo-Indians who used Sapelo to fish and hunt. A ferry service in nearby Meridian takes visitors to Sapelo, where Georgia State Parks guides and members of the historic Hog Hammock community offer tours.Continued...

Data Needed During Georgia’s Short Red Snapper Season

The Coastal Resources Division (CRD) of Georgia DNR is seeking help from recreational saltwater anglers in collecting data during the upcoming red snapper harvest season July 10-12 and July 17.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is allowing the harvest of one red snapper per person per day in federal waters at least 3 miles offshore with no minimum size restrictions during the period. CRD is asking anglers who filet their fish to donate the carcasses at one of 14 freezers located along Georgia’s coast at m...

The Coastal Resources Division (CRD) of Georgia DNR is seeking help from recreational saltwater anglers in collecting data during the upcoming red snapper harvest season July 10-12 and July 17.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is allowing the harvest of one red snapper per person per day in federal waters at least 3 miles offshore with no minimum size restrictions during the period. CRD is asking anglers who filet their fish to donate the carcasses at one of 14 freezers located along Georgia’s coast at marinas and bait shops. A complete list of locations is available at:

Fort McAllister Marina 3203 Fort McAllister Rd Richmond Hill (912) 727-2632
Morningstar Marinas Golden Isles 206 Marina Drive St. Simons Island (912) 480-0266
St. Simons Fishing Club 1000 Arthur J. Moore Drive St. Simons Island (912) 638 9146
Buccaneers Bait & Tackle 290 East Meeting St. St. Marys (912) 882-6277

(list last updated 7/1/20)

These carcasses will be examined by CRD biologists to gather data about the ages, sizes and growth rates of red snapper. This information will be shared with regional and federal partners and used in fishery management.

“Fishery management can be a difficult task,” said Carolyn Belcher, CRD’s chief of Marine Fisheries, “but the more data we have, the better our estimates are. We have a wide variety of surveys and programs to gather data, and the input from recreational anglers is a vital part of our data-gathering process.”

By donating red snapper carcasses, anglers are helping conserve the fishery for future generations, Belcher said.

Descending devices reduce terminal barotrauma occurrences by quickly sending the fish back to appropriate depths. These devices are offered by CRD free to the public with support from Yamaha and FishSmart.

When an angler or charter-boat group donates fish carcasses at any of the 14 freezer stations, the donor complete a registration card and attaches it to the plastic bag holding the carcasses. Two donors will be randomly selected to each receive a $50 gift card to Academy Sports. The donation stations are not limited to red snapper, and anglers are invited to donate carcasses of other species, as well.

Carcass donation is not the only way recreational anglers can help CRD collect valuable data about fisheries. Anglers can volunteer information about their fishing trips by visiting MyFishCount.com or downloading the mobile app in the Apple App Store or Google Play store for Android by searching “MyFishCount.” This program is an initiative of the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council which is responsible for the conservation and management of fish stocks within federal waters from three to 200 miles off the coasts of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and east Florida to Key West.

Anglers are also likely to see CRD staff at marinas, boat ramps, beaches and other common fishing locations. These staff members are collecting information as part of the Access Point Angler Intercept Survey. The short, in-person survey collects data about how and generally where anglers fished, how long they fished, which species were targeted and other data points. All data is given voluntarily and is confidential.

Additionally, anglers are invited to receive a free descending device to help reduce the unnecessary deaths of fish. These devices reverse the effects of rapid ascension of fish, which happens when a fish is hooked at depths of about 50 feet or greater and quickly reeled to the surface. When this occurs, the fish’s swim bladder, an organ that controls the fish’s buoyancy, expands uncontrollably and can cause the fish’s internal organs to protrude outside its body. This syndrome is known as “barotrauma.” Discarded fish experiencing barotrauma are unable to return to appropriate depths after they have been released and are frequently subject to predation.

Descending devices reduce terminal barotrauma occurrences by quickly sending the fish back to appropriate depths. These devices are offered by CRD free to the public with support from Yamaha and FishSmart, an initiative of the American Sportfishing Association. Participating anglers will be asked to complete a short, web-based survey in exchange for the descending devices. To receive a descending device, contact CRD’s Kathy Knowlton at 912.262.3122 or kathy.knowlton@dnr.ga.gov. Anglers are also encouraged to visit safmc.net/best-fishing-practices to learn more about available resources (e.g., videos of fish released with a descending device, how to use various types of devices, best practices to release fish).

Beginning July 15th, descending devices will be required on board and readily available for use on commercial, for-hire and private recreational vessels when targeting snapper-grouper species in federal waters in the South Atlantic. Click here or visit https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/action/regulatory-amendment-29-gear-requirements-south-atlantic-snapper-grouper-species for more information.

For more information about CRD’s Marine Fisheries Section, or to learn more about how anglers can conserve marine fisheries for present and future generations, visit www.CoastalGaDNR.org.

UGA grad known for his intricate sand sculptures, including replica of law school

From a young age, Dylan Edward Mulligan has been the architect and builder of some pretty incredible structures. Sadly, not one of his painstaking creations have stood the test of time.But that’s OK with the Glennville native, who graduated from the University of Georgia’s School of Law in 2018. The foundations for Mulligan’s developments are hard-sand beaches and the materials used for construction are generally that selfsame beach sand, occasionally augmented with marsh mud.Known as “The Georgia Sandma...

From a young age, Dylan Edward Mulligan has been the architect and builder of some pretty incredible structures. Sadly, not one of his painstaking creations have stood the test of time.

But that’s OK with the Glennville native, who graduated from the University of Georgia’s School of Law in 2018. The foundations for Mulligan’s developments are hard-sand beaches and the materials used for construction are generally that selfsame beach sand, occasionally augmented with marsh mud.

Known as “The Georgia Sandman,” Mulligan has built by hand with sand countless castles and replicas of historic buildings, primarily at Shellman Bluff in nearby McIntosh County and in other parts of Coastal Georgia, and at Ponce Inlet in Florida. Mulligan grew up spending summers on the Shellman Bluff’s tidal sandbars, where he can recall spending 12-hour days devoted to his latest sandcastle.

“I started making castles by turning buckets upside down and then I learned how to make drip castles out of mud by letting mud drip through your fingers,” said Mulligan, who made his first drip mud castle at the age of 4. “I’m basically self-taught and it was trial-and-error from there. I learned gradually how to build towers and then walls, and then the towers and walls got bigger and more elaborate. And it’s been a steady progress since then.”

One of six attorneys (and the youngest) in Tattnall County, Mulligan spent years perfecting his sandcastle craft and two years ago branched out to building granular facsimiles of historic buildings. One of his most recent projects depicted UGA’s School of Law building, which not surprisingly turned out to be a social media hit among Georgia folks.

Mulligan, a Glennville-Tattnall historian, said it took him nearly four hours to build the law school replica in mid-July on the Juliaton River at Shellman Bluff.

“There are not many spots where you can build anything but there’s one isolated area I’ve identified that’s got a lot of good marsh mud mixed in and you can build there,” said Mulligan, who serves on the board of trustees of the Glennville-Tattnall Museum and the Friends of the Glennwanis Hotel. “I almost messed up with this one. I didn’t get in my normal spot – I got a little too far back. And I hit a pocket of nothing but marsh mud. That’s partly why if you look at the pictures, the infrastructure itself is a lot darker than what I normally build. It’s a thick, black soft clay.

“I made the mistake of trying to build that thing with this mud. It took me forever because it holds water so much I couldn’t get it to dry and I could hardly get it to hold its shape, It was a real challenge getting it shaped and getting it carved, but I finally managed to get it together.”

Before tackling the law school project, Mulligan made a Fourth of July recreation of a favored campus spot from his undergraduate days at Georgia Southern.

“I figured since I went to Georgia Southern and UGA, I’m going to do the law school at Georgia and the Pittman Building at Southern,” he said. “A tribute to my two alma maters.”

Mulligan admits that in his early castle-building days, he cursed the daily tide that reclaimed his creations. But he long ago came to grips with the realities of his passion and he can abide the eventual-but-eternal outcome.

“I reconciled myself to that a long time ago,” he said. “When I was young and first started building, that was something I dwelled on all the time and it would run me crazy trying to stop the tide. One time, when I was 10 or 11, some cousins and I were working on a castle and the tide was coming in. So we put up a massive seawall all the way around the castle trying to prevent the tide from coming in. We did a pretty good job – we held it off for a while. But you are not going to beat the tide.

“I came to realization a long time ago that nothing on this earth is permanent, especially when you build it out of sand. It’s a natural cycle. When you build something like this, part of that process and part of that cycle is seeing it go back to what you made it of, the sand itself.

“There’s an old saying – ‘Time and tide wait for no man.’ And a friend of mine, Kathleen Russell, the editor of the Darrien News, modified that to say that ‘time and tide wait for no sandman.’ That’s become one of my slogans.”

While building castles from the sand is a solitary pursuit, Mulligan has found that his labors do spark a good bit of conversation.

“It’s a people activity because it always draws a crowd,” he said. “Wherever I’m at, if there are other people there, they’re always popping by wondering what I’m doing and taking pictures. You get to meet a lot of people and talk to a lot of people.”

Mulligan published a photo book of his many sandcastles and proceeds from sales of the book benefit the Glennwanis Hotel as a home for the Glennville-Tattnall Museum. For more information, visit www.thegeorgiasandman.square.site.

Georgia man builds incredible ‘Downton Abbey’ sandcastle

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. – A man in Georgia stunned beachgoers on Tuesday when he built a jaw-dropping sandcastle at Gould’s Inlet, East Beach on St. Simons Island.It took Dylan “The Sandman” Mulligan approximately seven hours to construct his “Sandship” sandcastle. He got his inspiration from the ...

ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. – A man in Georgia stunned beachgoers on Tuesday when he built a jaw-dropping sandcastle at Gould’s Inlet, East Beach on St. Simons Island.

It took Dylan “The Sandman” Mulligan approximately seven hours to construct his “Sandship” sandcastle. He got his inspiration from the Highclere Castle, known to the world as Downton Abbey.

“I have always been a Downton Abbey fan and an admirer of the architecture and history of Highclere Castle, as well as Lord and Lady Carnarvon’s efforts to preserve the castle, Mulligan told News4Jax. “I had always wanted to construct a replica of it, so I finally decided to make it happen.”

The sandcastle contained more than 100 gallons of water and was “without doubt one of the most detailed, labor-intensive sandcastles he had ever constructed.”

Mulligan has been sculpting sandcastles on the Georgia and Florida coasts for more than two decades. His popular creations have appeared at various points along the coast –– from the pristine and untouched wilderness of Blackbeard Island National Wildlife Refuge and the tidal sandbars of Shellman Bluff in McIntosh County, Georgia, to East Beach on St. Simons Island, all the way to the beautiful beaches of Ponce Inlet.

He also published a picture book of on his creations called “The Georgia Sandman.”

His goal by building the sandcastles is to raise awareness for historic preservation.

“I seek to draw attention to preservation efforts in every community and at large, all of my personal efforts center on the restoration of the historic Glennwanis Hotel in my hometown of Glennville as a new home for our local museum,” Mulligan said. “All profits I am able to generate from the sale of my books and prints are donated to that nonprofit organization.”

For more information, you can visit his website, or find him on social media — Facebook and Instagram.

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Where to eat local seafood on Georgia’s coast

Seafood described as fresh and local at restaurants on the Georgia coast isn’t always so, despite close proximity to fishing grounds along the state’s 100-mile coastline. “The reality is that less than 10 percent of [Georgia] restaurants use our local shrimp,” says John Wallace, owner of Poteet Seafood, a Brunswick distributor. It’s worse for fish. Catch limits and regulations can make commercial saltwater finfishing unprofitable. Last fall, hurricanes interrupted the catches for the few Georgia fishermen still ...

Seafood described as fresh and local at restaurants on the Georgia coast isn’t always so, despite close proximity to fishing grounds along the state’s 100-mile coastline. “The reality is that less than 10 percent of [Georgia] restaurants use our local shrimp,” says John Wallace, owner of Poteet Seafood, a Brunswick distributor. It’s worse for fish. Catch limits and regulations can make commercial saltwater finfishing unprofitable. Last fall, hurricanes interrupted the catches for the few Georgia fishermen still working, and the storms and other factors limited local supplies of flounder, snapper, and grouper.

To find out if a restaurant’s seafood is truly local, “the only thing to do is ask and hope they tell the truth,” Wallace says. Some tips: Seek out the Wild Georgia Shrimp decal on entryways and menus; order whiting, a shrimp bycatch, when possible; be skeptical of fish provenance in late winter and early spring (when fisheries close while fish spawn); and expect fried oysters to come from Texas or Louisiana, at best. One local catch that can always be trusted? Blue crabs. They’re abundant but messy to eat, which is why most restaurants don’t serve them.

Luckily, enough coastal restaurants do local well and fess up when they don’t. Here’s a selection of standouts.

Sunbury Crab CompanyOrder a basket of steamed blue crabs, and the server trots out a placemat, a wooden mallet, and a bucket for the piles of cracked shells you’re about to create. There’s nothing tidy about dismantling a blue crab for its succulent meat, but the chaos is worth it. The Maley family, which built this restaurant from the ground up, harvests its own crabs and oysters from St. Catherine’s Sound, a short boat ride up the Medway River from the restaurant’s marina. (Sunbury is about an hour’s drive south from Tybee or north from Jekyll.) Clusters of wild local oysters are served steamed when in season, from fall to spring. Finfish isn’t always local—the chef tries to catch enough trout himself to keep customers satisfied—but the quality is high. On a recent visit, breaded redfish commanded space in a stuffed fry basket, and a bone-in flounder was served spiced and grilled—head removed, tail on. 541 Brigantine-Dunmore Road, Sunbury, 912-884-8640

Doo DadsRetired paper mill worker Larry Geter made a name for himself in Camden County and Jacksonville as a James Brown impersonator. He’s so proud of his likeness to the soul star that he keeps comparative photographs posted on a sandwich board that leans against his roadside restaurant. All manner of proteins come freshly fried out of Geter’s makeshift outdoor kitchen—from alligator to chicken gizzards. Deep-fried blue crabs, whiting, and conch fritters, served with a tangy homemade conch sauce, are worth a stop. You won’t miss the place: Bright yellow signs and 14-foot-tall pink flags scream “Doo Dads.” 99 Kinlaw Road, Woodbine, 912-674-7824

The Fish DockPerched on a tall bluff skirting the Sapelo River in sleepy McIntosh County, the Fish Dock is the closest the Georgia coast comes to a true sea-to-table restaurant. Owner Charlie Phillips is a fishing industry legend in Georgia. He owns Sapelo Sea Farms, the largest clam farm in the state, leases wild oyster beds, and operates a legion of fishing and shrimp boats. All that catch eventually becomes bowls of clams steamed in wine and butter, blackened whole margate or black sea bass, and soft-shell crab sandwiches in a dining room that overlooks Charlie’s fleet. 1398 Sapelo Avenue, Townsend, 912-832-4295

Desposito’sSavannah’s no-frills port city roots are on display at this low-slung bar tucked beside the Thunderbolt Bridge, en route to Tybee Island, where newspapers cover the tables. Nelson’s Quality Shrimp, just a net toss away from Desposito’s kitchen door, keeps this half-century-old marshside establishment stocked with Georgia brown shrimp. Choose blue crabs (boiled) and shrimp (garlicky or deep fried) over the trucked-in oysters and Alaskan snow crab legs. 3501 Macceo Drive, Thunderbolt, 912-897-9963

Best of the restIn Shellman Bluff, Speed’s Kitchen (1191 Speeds Kitchen Road) is good for fried shrimp and deviled crab and Hunter’s Cafe (1093 River Road) for a grouper sandwich or steamed wild oysters.

In downtown Woodbine, Captain Stan’s Smokehouse (700 Bedell Avenue), a popular spot for barbecue and nightlife, sautés local shrimp in garlic and vermouth.

This article appears in our July 2018 issue.

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