AC repair inShellman Bluff, GA

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As a homeowner, you know that your HVAC unit is one of the most important components in your house. It keeps you cool during hot summer days and warm on chilly winter nights. When it's working properly, it's easy to forget its important role in your everyday life. But when it malfunctions, you quickly remember how crucial heating and AC repair in Shellman Bluff, GA, is for your family.

At Liberty Heating & Airworx AC, our mission is to ensure your cooling and heating systems remain effective throughout the year at the lowest prices available. Unlike some of our competitors, we prefer to put our customers first before anything else. We believe in doing right by the folks who choose our business. Cutting corners to save a few bucks? Annoying sales pitches to try and sell you new parts or equipment? That's just not the way we do business.

When you choose Liberty Heating & Airworx AC, you can rest easy knowing you won't have to pay outlandish fees for our services. As a licensed, bonded heating and air conditioning company, we know how important trust is when it comes to the nature of our business. We go above and beyond other HVAC companies and treat your home like it was our own. That way, you have peace of mind knowing you and your family are in capable, responsible hands.

We take pride in providing our customers with the highest quality service. Our highly trained technicians have experience handling all aspects of HVAC repair, from routine maintenance problems to advanced A/C unit installation projects in Shellman Bluff, GA.

Through hard work, honesty, and integrity, we have built a loyal customer base that continues to grow each month. It would be our honor to call you our customer too. Whether you need a routine maintenance check or emergency heater repair in Shellman Bluff, we are here for you every step of the way, 24-hours a day.

Air Conditioning Repair Services Shellman Bluff, GA

Service Areas

Why Choose Liberty Heating & Airworx AC?

We get it - there are a lot of A/C companies out there to sift through. You want to be sure you choose the best company for your needs and budget.

 AC Repair Services Shellman Bluff, GA

Here are just a few reasons why our customers choose Liberty Heating & Airworx AC over other HVAC companies in South Georgia:

Authorized Carrier and Goodman Dealer:

Authorized Carrier and Goodman Dealer:

We're authorized to service and sell two of the most respected brands in the heating and A/C industry. No matter what size home you own, our technicians are fully equipped to handle any HVAC issue with your Goodman, Carrier, or other air conditioning units.

Insured, Bonded, and Licensed:

Insured, Bonded, and Licensed:

We go the extra mile to ensure that our customers feel safe and protected when they hire our team. We treat your home like it was our own, from the moment we step foot on your property to the time we pull out of your driveway.

Fair Pricing

Fair Pricing

We understand that money doesn't just grow on trees. You work hard to make an honest living and need reasonable pricing on A/C repair and other HVAC services. At Liberty Heating & Airworx AC, you'll never have to worry about us charging you outrageous prices.

Flexible Financing

Flexible Financing

Has your heater gone out in the middle of a freezing January night? A/C unit quit working in the middle of summer? Despite some common red flags that you can keep an eye out for, you can never really plan for an HVAC malfunction. That's why we offer emergency HVAC services in Shellman Bluff, 24-hours a day, seven days a week.

Year-Round Discounts

Year-Round Discounts

With Ft. Stewart just a few minutes away, Shellman Bluff has one of Georgia's largest active military populations. It is our honor to offer current and retired military members and their families discounted prices on their next service appointment. We also offer up to 10% off for Federal Law Enforcement Training Center Members. It's our small way of giving back to those who have sacrificed so much for our liberty.

Free Estimates

Free Estimates

From new unit installations to air conditioning repair, it would be our pleasure to provide you with a free estimate on our services.

Emergency Service

Emergency Service

Has your heater gone out in the middle of a freezing January night? A/C unit quit working in the middle of summer? Despite some common red flags that you can keep an eye out for, you can never really plan for an HVAC malfunction. That's why we offer emergency HVAC services in Shellman Bluff, 24-hours a day, seven days a week.

Flexible Financing

Flexible Financing:

When your A/C unit or heater breaks suddenly, it can be hard to squeeze repairs into your budget. To make sure all of our customers are comfortable in their homes, we offer financing options to make your life easier.

Air Conditioning Repair in Shellman Bluff, GA

Here in southern Georgia, our summers can be extremely hot and humid. Trying to live in a home without A/C a South Georgia summer isn't just a bad idea; it can be downright deadly. Fortunately, Liberty Heating & Airworx AC is here to help with all of your A/C needs. There's no A/C issue that our highly trained HVAC technicians haven't seen before, and no job too small or large for us to tackle. Whether your A/C system needs a basic issue resolved, or you need a new AC unit installed at your house, our team will be at your door in no time.

We have the experience and training to service all major air conditioning systems, from ductless systems to central air setups. We're authorized to service Goodman to Carrier brands, but the truth is it doesn't matter what A/C unit brand you have - our team can fix it all. If your unit is beyond repair, we can walk you through the process of installing a new A/C system and suggest appropriate units that will work well for your home.

Here are just a few of the most common A/C repair services we offer in Shellman Bluff and the surrounding area:

  • Electrical repair
  • Compressor Repair
  • Refrigerant Leaks
  • Refrigerant Recharges
  • Replace Blower Motor
 AC Repair Shellman Bluff, GA

Common Signs That
You Need AC Repair in
Shellman Bluff, GA

Once springtime rolls around, it's very important that you keep your eyes and ears open for any potential warning signs that your A/C unit needs to be repaired. The last thing you need is to be caught off guard when June, July, and August are in full swing. Knowledge is power, and at Liberty Heating & Airworx AC, committed to keeping our customers in the loop about potential A/C repair warning signs. That way, you can take preventative steps rather than reactive ones.

 Heater Repair Services Shellman Bluff, GA
Loud-Unusual-Noises
Loud, Unusual Noises

Don't be alarmed if your A/C unit makes low-level noises throughout the day and night - these sounds are completely normal. However, if you hear loud, unusually abrupt noises coming from your unit, it may be time to have it repaired. Buzzing or rattling noises can mean a part is loose, while grinding or whistling can signal a more serious problem. Because these types of issues won't work themselves out on their own, a professional is needed to diagnose and correct the problem.

Strong-Odors
Strong Odors

If you notice strange, smelly odors permeating throughout your home, your first instinct may be to grab the air freshener. However, unpleasant odors can be a sign that your A/C unit needs attention. Our A/C repair techs will let you know what's going on and how a potential issue can be remediated with a quick diagnostic test.

Refrigerant or Water Leaks
Refrigerant or Water Leaks

Your A/C unit needs refrigerant to keep your home cool and comfortable when it's hot outside. It's common for condensation to accumulate as your system cools your home. With that said, if you notice pooling water or an active leak coming from your A/C system, it's time to call an A/C repair tech ASAP. Leaks can cause extensive damage to your home, and the problem needs to be addressed quickly.

Heater Repair in
Shellman Bluff, GA

South Georgia isn't known for its freezing temperatures, but one thing is for sure - wintertime in Shellman Bluff can get very cold. When the temps begin to drop, your home's furnace works properly. Modern homes have come a long way since the days of wood and coal. Your home's heater is complicated, and when one component fails, the entire system can be affected. In situations like these, it's important not to panic. Instead, give Liberty Heating & Airworx AC a call. Our trustworthy team of heating repair experts have the knowledge and training to repair your furnace fast, so you can get back to enjoying your home.

Here are just a few of the most common issues that we can help repair:

  • No Heat
  • Thermostat Malfunction
  • Heat Pump Replacement
  • Ignition and Pilot Problems
  • Noisy Heater
  • Emergency Services
  • Much More!
 Heating And AC Services Shellman Bluff, GA

Common Signs That You Need Furnace Repair in Shellman Bluff, GA

 Heating And Cooling Repair Shellman Bluff, GA

Today's heating systems are complex. At Liberty Heating & Airworx AC, our heating repair technicians receive ongoing training in all aspects of heating technology. That way, their skills stay sharp, and their techniques remain up to date. However, you don't need to be an expert to spot common signs that your heater may need to be repaired.

As colder months approach in Georgia, try to be aware of the following red flags:

Expensive Heating Bill

You're probably used to a more expensive electricity bill when winter hits Shellman Bluff. However, if you notice a huge price jump over last year's bill, it could be a sign that something is wrong with your heating system. Utility companies are known for raising prices gradually, but a dramatic leap is a cause for concern.

Uneven Heating
Uneven-Heating

Does your heater seem to work perfectly in some areas of your house but not others? Are some rooms too hot while others are drafty and cold? If so, your heater may need repairing. This is a common issue in older homes and requires an expert to inspect your heater and ducts for airflow problems.

Unhealthy Air Quality
Unhealthy Air Quality

If the air in your house is hazy no matter how much you dust, your heater may be the problem. A furnace that circulates mildew, dust, and other harmful particles isn't working correctly. This issue is particularly bad for people with asthma or respiratory illnesses. If you haven't changed your home's air filter recently, be sure to do so. If the problem persists, it's time to call Liberty Heating & Airworx AC.

New AC Installation
in Shellman Bluff, GA

You and your family depend on your home's A/C system to keep you cool and comfortable during the hottest months of the year. Unfortunately, breakdowns happen at the worst possible times - like in the middle of July when temperatures are over 90 degrees. If you have had to repair your A/C system more and more often, investing in a new cooling system will save you time and money in the long run.

As an Authorized Carrier and Goodman dealer - two of the most recognized and respected brands in our industry - we have the highest quality units available. We handle every aspect of your new A/C installation from start to finish. That way, you can focus on living your life rather than worrying about the next time your A/C goes out.

Curious when it might be time for a new A/C system?

Keep an eye out for these warning signs:

Dusty Furniture

 HVAC Shellman Bluff, GA

If you have kept your unit well-maintained and changed your air filter regularly, you shouldn't experience this problem. If you do, and your system is old, it can be more cost-effective to replace it and have your duct system analyzed to fix the root cause of your dust issue.

High Humidity

 HVAC Repair Services Shellman Bluff, GA

If it feels unusually sticky in your home, like you just spent a few hours outside in the summertime, there's a good chance that something is seriously wrong with your air conditioning. Your air conditioner's job is to pull moisture out of the air to keep your feeling cool inside. When that process fails, it can increase your risk of mold and mildew growth - and that's just the start.

Frequent Repairs

 HVAC Services Shellman Bluff, GA

When your repair bills end up costing more than a down payment on a new A/C system, it might make more financial sense to invest in a more modern unit. Compare how much it costs to have our maintenance technicians perform regular service vs. the cost of a new air conditioning installation. The results may surprise you.

Liberty Heating & Airworx AC

We Are Your Trusted Local Source For Heating And Air Conditioning Services

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912-408-3131

Latest News in Shellman Bluff, GA

Oaks on the River Luxury Boutique Resort:

The picturesque Darien waterfront is bustling with new construction. Real estate developer Art Lucas, of Lucas Properties, saw an opportunity five or so years ago, and together with the McIntosh County Industrial Development Authority, put together a planned development package for the city’s riverfront bluff that included luxury condominiums, a restaurant, resort and small marina.The restaurant became the well-known Spartina Grill, the condos are built and completely sold and the marina is in place. The only thing left to compl...

The picturesque Darien waterfront is bustling with new construction. Real estate developer Art Lucas, of Lucas Properties, saw an opportunity five or so years ago, and together with the McIntosh County Industrial Development Authority, put together a planned development package for the city’s riverfront bluff that included luxury condominiums, a restaurant, resort and small marina.

The restaurant became the well-known Spartina Grill, the condos are built and completely sold and the marina is in place. The only thing left to complete is the hotel.

Oaks on the River Luxury Boutique Resort will be the “crown jewel of the Darien waterfront,” according to a previous statement issued by Lucas.

Michael Brown, Director of Sales and Marketing for the hotel, says opening day will occur over Memorial Day weekend 2022.

“Construction is on schedule,” he said.

Brown is excited about what is unfolding for the 53-room resort.

Posh amenities, including designer furniture from Bernhardt throughout, high thread-count linens in guest rooms, and Churchill china from England in the restaurant are among some of the finer touches.

“Our managing director, Bernard Sarme, has an eye for design and detail,” Brown said.

The small resort, Brown said, provides a very personal, yet ultimately luxury experience.

Special touches abound.

“There’s no giant front desk,” he explained. Rather, receptionists will sit, concierge-style, at two separate desks to register guests.

The ambience of Oaks on the River Luxury Boutique Resort is reminiscent of a British country lodge.

“We like to call it Low Country luxury,” said Brown.

Activities also will abound. The resort’s position along “the ecology coast” will give guests access to bicycle tours, deep-sea fishing, Altamaha River trips, plus excursions to Sapelo Island and other points of interest in McIntosh County. Bike rentals and kayak trips are available now, and the general public is welcome. All rentals are on a first-come, first-serve, basis.

Developers are anticipating the arrival of the 32-passenger Delta Belle, a pontoon boat that will be suitable for sunset cruises, special events and beach and nature trips to nearby Sapelo and Blackbeard islands.

“We have done a lot of work with the (Georgia) DNR to make that happen,” Brown said.

The hotel has also partnered with Sapelo Hammock Golf Club in Shellman Bluff to provide access to golf for its guests. A complimentary shuttle will transport people between the hotel and the golf club.

Special events on the horizon include a possible wedding show in January, at which time the Delta Belle will be unveiled.

The event space is impressive for such a small property, Brown said. There are two event lawns – the Caledonia Lawn, the focal point of which is the 275-year-old Caledonia Oak, which accommodates nearly 300 people comfortably – and the Oaks Landing Lawn, which also includes a 20’ x 20’ screened and covered dock.

Indoors, the 2,500-square-foot Thorpe Ballroom can be divided into four meeting spaces, giving the hotel a great deal of flexible function space.

The property also features a restaurant, spa, pool bar & bistro, and fitness center adding to its allure for overnighters, weekend wanderers and vacationers.

“The Oaks Club is the main restaurant, and it will accommodate 86 people,” said Brown. “We just hired a food and beverage manager, and the menu is being developed.”

The menu will feature plenty of fresh local seafood, and there will be a Sunday brunch offered with Bloody Marys and mimosas, Brown said.

In addition, the restaurant will also host tastings featuring wine, Scotch and bourbon. The Scotch tastings, Brown said, are particularly significant because of the history and heritage of Darien.

Darien is the second-oldest city in Georgia, founded in 1736 by Scottish Highlanders recruited by James Oglethorpe.

The atmosphere of the restaurant will be upscale, but not stuffy.

“You’ll have a five-star dinner experience, but there’s no need for a jacket,” he said.

Also on the property, the Cedar Bar will feature a bar made from a cedar tree harvested from the Lucas farm in the Harris Neck area, milled to exact specifications. The Oaks on the River team looks forward to the bar and restaurant being gathering spots for hotel guests and locals to enjoy.

Oaks on the River Boutique Resort’s location in Darien makes it easily accessible via Interstate 95 and airports in Brunswick, Savannah and Jacksonville, Fla. It’s also close to St. Simons Island and Jekyll Island.

UGA grad known for his intricate sand sculptures, including replica of law school

From a young age, Dylan Edward Mulligan has been the architect and builder of some pretty incredible structures. Sadly, not one of his painstaking creations have stood the test of time.But that’s OK with the Glennville native, who graduated from the University of Georgia’s School of Law in 2018. The foundations for Mulligan’s developments are hard-sand beaches and the materials used for construction are generally that selfsame beach sand, occasionally augmented with marsh mud.Known as “The Georgia Sandma...

From a young age, Dylan Edward Mulligan has been the architect and builder of some pretty incredible structures. Sadly, not one of his painstaking creations have stood the test of time.

But that’s OK with the Glennville native, who graduated from the University of Georgia’s School of Law in 2018. The foundations for Mulligan’s developments are hard-sand beaches and the materials used for construction are generally that selfsame beach sand, occasionally augmented with marsh mud.

Known as “The Georgia Sandman,” Mulligan has built by hand with sand countless castles and replicas of historic buildings, primarily at Shellman Bluff in nearby McIntosh County and in other parts of Coastal Georgia, and at Ponce Inlet in Florida. Mulligan grew up spending summers on the Shellman Bluff’s tidal sandbars, where he can recall spending 12-hour days devoted to his latest sandcastle.

“I started making castles by turning buckets upside down and then I learned how to make drip castles out of mud by letting mud drip through your fingers,” said Mulligan, who made his first drip mud castle at the age of 4. “I’m basically self-taught and it was trial-and-error from there. I learned gradually how to build towers and then walls, and then the towers and walls got bigger and more elaborate. And it’s been a steady progress since then.”

One of six attorneys (and the youngest) in Tattnall County, Mulligan spent years perfecting his sandcastle craft and two years ago branched out to building granular facsimiles of historic buildings. One of his most recent projects depicted UGA’s School of Law building, which not surprisingly turned out to be a social media hit among Georgia folks.

Mulligan, a Glennville-Tattnall historian, said it took him nearly four hours to build the law school replica in mid-July on the Juliaton River at Shellman Bluff.

“There are not many spots where you can build anything but there’s one isolated area I’ve identified that’s got a lot of good marsh mud mixed in and you can build there,” said Mulligan, who serves on the board of trustees of the Glennville-Tattnall Museum and the Friends of the Glennwanis Hotel. “I almost messed up with this one. I didn’t get in my normal spot – I got a little too far back. And I hit a pocket of nothing but marsh mud. That’s partly why if you look at the pictures, the infrastructure itself is a lot darker than what I normally build. It’s a thick, black soft clay.

“I made the mistake of trying to build that thing with this mud. It took me forever because it holds water so much I couldn’t get it to dry and I could hardly get it to hold its shape, It was a real challenge getting it shaped and getting it carved, but I finally managed to get it together.”

Before tackling the law school project, Mulligan made a Fourth of July recreation of a favored campus spot from his undergraduate days at Georgia Southern.

“I figured since I went to Georgia Southern and UGA, I’m going to do the law school at Georgia and the Pittman Building at Southern,” he said. “A tribute to my two alma maters.”

Mulligan admits that in his early castle-building days, he cursed the daily tide that reclaimed his creations. But he long ago came to grips with the realities of his passion and he can abide the eventual-but-eternal outcome.

“I reconciled myself to that a long time ago,” he said. “When I was young and first started building, that was something I dwelled on all the time and it would run me crazy trying to stop the tide. One time, when I was 10 or 11, some cousins and I were working on a castle and the tide was coming in. So we put up a massive seawall all the way around the castle trying to prevent the tide from coming in. We did a pretty good job – we held it off for a while. But you are not going to beat the tide.

“I came to realization a long time ago that nothing on this earth is permanent, especially when you build it out of sand. It’s a natural cycle. When you build something like this, part of that process and part of that cycle is seeing it go back to what you made it of, the sand itself.

“There’s an old saying – ‘Time and tide wait for no man.’ And a friend of mine, Kathleen Russell, the editor of the Darrien News, modified that to say that ‘time and tide wait for no sandman.’ That’s become one of my slogans.”

While building castles from the sand is a solitary pursuit, Mulligan has found that his labors do spark a good bit of conversation.

“It’s a people activity because it always draws a crowd,” he said. “Wherever I’m at, if there are other people there, they’re always popping by wondering what I’m doing and taking pictures. You get to meet a lot of people and talk to a lot of people.”

Mulligan published a photo book of his many sandcastles and proceeds from sales of the book benefit the Glennwanis Hotel as a home for the Glennville-Tattnall Museum. For more information, visit www.thegeorgiasandman.square.site.

Golf-Home Owners Chip In To Save Struggling Courses

Nine years ago, Sapelo Hammock was losing money, and became one of the many golf courses to close across the country. As the value of the homes on the deteriorating course plummeted, Mr. Hardy and his neighbors raised the money to buy it, then worked for months clearing brush and pulling weeds. Now that the course has reopened and they can afford to hire staff, Mr. Hardy said neighbors—many of whom are 60 and above—still get together about twice a month to help maintain the course.“We take pride in the success of it,...

Nine years ago, Sapelo Hammock was losing money, and became one of the many golf courses to close across the country. As the value of the homes on the deteriorating course plummeted, Mr. Hardy and his neighbors raised the money to buy it, then worked for months clearing brush and pulling weeds. Now that the course has reopened and they can afford to hire staff, Mr. Hardy said neighbors—many of whom are 60 and above—still get together about twice a month to help maintain the course.

“We take pride in the success of it,” said Mr. Hardy, 68, a retired pharmaceutical industry executive who spent about $1 million to build his five-bedroom house on the course 12 years ago.

Starting in the 1980s, real-estate developers across the country built thousands of housing developments centered around golf courses. The resulting oversupply, combined with declining golf participation, is causing many courses to close: almost 2,000 courses shuttered between 2006 and 2018, according to Pellucid Corp., a golf industry information provider.

The closures have torpedoed the value of nearby homes, as manicured greens are replaced by unsightly dead grass. Many of these defunct golf courses are redeveloped as housing, purchased by municipalities, or simply abandoned. But a few intrepid homeowners, determined to protect their investments, are taking it upon themselves to keep their courses afloat. This long-shot approach requires residents to provide plenty of money, time and labor, from mowing grass and washing dishes to accounting, with no guarantee of success. But the few who have succeeded say they found it to be surprisingly rewarding.

Saving Struggling Golf Courses

Residents surrounding Sapelo Hammock Golf Club in Georgia and the Champions Club in Tennessee pooled their money to buy the courses and bring them back to life.

When Sapelo Hammock closed, values of the neighboring homes fell about 30%, said Mr. Hardy. He started “knocking on doors,” telling neighbors that “we can turn this thing around if we come together.”

Mr. Hardy contributed more than $100,000 to buy the 171-acre course, and eventually secured contributions from 136 families, most of whom live in the roughly 145 homes in the communities bordering the golf course. The group bought the course for $1 million in 2011 with a loan from a local bank, then set about repairing the course. They held events like a “Goosegrass cocktail party,” where about 40 couples brought drinks and music out on to the course while digging up the weed, which can destroy greens, Mr. Hardy said. Less than a year after the purchase, the course reopened.

At first the club lost money every year, and it was on the verge of shuttering when a preferred stock offering with private placement in early 2018 added an infusion of capital, Mr. Hardy said.

Today, the course is breaking even, though neighbors still sometimes contribute cash for special projects, and Sapelo Hammock is “on a steady path,” Mr. Hardy said.

He’s not expecting to make a profit on the venture—at least not in the traditional sense.

“You’re going to make money, but a little bit differently,” he said. “You may make it in the value of your home, or in quality of life. You can’t go in as a traditional investor and say, ‘where’s my return on investment?’”

Heather Ridge Country Club, in Aurora, Colo., had been on and off the market for years when residents stepped in. Developers were making offers to buy the course, and residents feared it would be turned into thousands of high-rise apartments.

“If we let this go into 5,000 new front doors, our property values would have gone down and our way of life would change significantly,” said Errol Rowland, 76, a retired IBM executive who paid $86,000 in 1997 for a home on the 13th hole. In addition to losing the golf course views, he said, they were concerned about “keeping the bad elements out.”

Residents voted to form the Heather Ridge Metropolitan District, a quasi-government entity which then issued municipal bonds to purchase the golf course out of foreclosure for $3.1 million in 2009, with the bonds to be repaid through taxes paid by homeowners within the district.

The Metro District has since made improvements to the long-neglected course, including new irrigation systems, a well, cart paths and redesigned tee boxes. Today, the course is thriving and even turning a profit, said Mr. Rowland.

But it wasn’t easy. “I can’t tell you the amount of hours and time we put into it,” said Van Lewis, 72, a local real-estate agent who paid about $215,000 in 2002 for a three-bedroom house by the 14th green at Heather Ridge. At first, “we had no freaking idea what we were doing.”

Part of the challenge was convincing neighbors to fund the purchase of the course, especially since it turned out that most weren’t golfers. Instead, group leaders emphasized the potential for falling property values and lost views. Mr. Lewis recalled spending night after night at community meetings trying to rally residents. “It was like we were selling Tupperware,” he said.

But Mr. Rowland said he has found saving the golf course to be “very rewarding.”

“My son says, ‘Dad, you and these people at Heather Ridge, your I-give-a-damn factor is off the charts. You’re doing all this work and you’re not getting paid a dime,’” he adds. “This has kept me young.”

Many communities attempt similar feats, but most fail due to the massive amounts of time and money required. It’s not easy to get homeowners to open their wallets, as Bill Cronin discovered when he and three golf buddies at the Champions Club near Chattanooga, Tenn., asked fellow members to contribute money to buy the struggling club.

“We didn’t have people who were signing up to write us the check,” recalled Mr. Cronin, 55, who paid about $804,000 for a home on the 17th hole 12 years ago. (He sold last year for about $825,000 due to divorce and now lives nearby.)

So the four friends put up their own money to buy Champions Club for $2.1 million in late 2018. Because they couldn’t get traditional financing for the purchase, the seller agreed to give them a loan.

They’ve since spent about $1 million refurbishing the course, clubhouse and swimming pool. The partners hope the homeowners associations for the three neighborhoods abutting the club will eventually acquire it, allowing them to recoup their investments. “Our goal is to break even,” he said.

In the meantime, the owners volunteer at the club on nights and weekends. Mr. Cronin said he spent a recent Friday night washing dishes in the club’s restaurant, and he plans to work alongside the maintenance crew on an upcoming vacation. To him, the time and money is worth it to prop up property values and return the club to a neighborhood gathering place. “We’re doing it one, to save the golf course,” he said, “but two, to save the community.”

Data Needed During Georgia’s Short Red Snapper Season

The Coastal Resources Division (CRD) of Georgia DNR is seeking help from recreational saltwater anglers in collecting data during the upcoming red snapper harvest season July 10-12 and July 17.The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is allowing the harvest of one red snapper per person per day in federal waters at least 3 miles offshore with no minimum size restrictions during the period. CRD is asking anglers who filet their fish to donate the carcasses at one of 14 freezers located along Georgia’s coast at m...

The Coastal Resources Division (CRD) of Georgia DNR is seeking help from recreational saltwater anglers in collecting data during the upcoming red snapper harvest season July 10-12 and July 17.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is allowing the harvest of one red snapper per person per day in federal waters at least 3 miles offshore with no minimum size restrictions during the period. CRD is asking anglers who filet their fish to donate the carcasses at one of 14 freezers located along Georgia’s coast at marinas and bait shops. A complete list of locations is available at:

Fort McAllister Marina 3203 Fort McAllister Rd Richmond Hill (912) 727-2632
Halfmoon Marina 171 Azalea Road Midway (912) 884-5819
Morningstar Marinas Golden Isles 206 Marina Drive St. Simons Island (912) 480-0266
St. Simons Fishing Club 1000 Arthur J. Moore Drive St. Simons Island (912) 638 9146
Buccaneers Bait & Tackle 290 East Meeting St. St. Marys (912) 882-6277

(list last updated 7/1/20)

These carcasses will be examined by CRD biologists to gather data about the ages, sizes and growth rates of red snapper. This information will be shared with regional and federal partners and used in fishery management.

“Fishery management can be a difficult task,” said Carolyn Belcher, CRD’s chief of Marine Fisheries, “but the more data we have, the better our estimates are. We have a wide variety of surveys and programs to gather data, and the input from recreational anglers is a vital part of our data-gathering process.”

By donating red snapper carcasses, anglers are helping conserve the fishery for future generations, Belcher said.

Descending devices reduce terminal barotrauma occurrences by quickly sending the fish back to appropriate depths. These devices are offered by CRD free to the public with support from Yamaha and FishSmart.

When an angler or charter-boat group donates fish carcasses at any of the 14 freezer stations, the donor complete a registration card and attaches it to the plastic bag holding the carcasses. Two donors will be randomly selected to each receive a $50 gift card to Academy Sports. The donation stations are not limited to red snapper, and anglers are invited to donate carcasses of other species, as well.

Carcass donation is not the only way recreational anglers can help CRD collect valuable data about fisheries. Anglers can volunteer information about their fishing trips by visiting MyFishCount.com or downloading the mobile app in the Apple App Store or Google Play store for Android by searching “MyFishCount.” This program is an initiative of the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council which is responsible for the conservation and management of fish stocks within federal waters from three to 200 miles off the coasts of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia and east Florida to Key West.

Anglers are also likely to see CRD staff at marinas, boat ramps, beaches and other common fishing locations. These staff members are collecting information as part of the Access Point Angler Intercept Survey. The short, in-person survey collects data about how and generally where anglers fished, how long they fished, which species were targeted and other data points. All data is given voluntarily and is confidential.

Additionally, anglers are invited to receive a free descending device to help reduce the unnecessary deaths of fish. These devices reverse the effects of rapid ascension of fish, which happens when a fish is hooked at depths of about 50 feet or greater and quickly reeled to the surface. When this occurs, the fish’s swim bladder, an organ that controls the fish’s buoyancy, expands uncontrollably and can cause the fish’s internal organs to protrude outside its body. This syndrome is known as “barotrauma.” Discarded fish experiencing barotrauma are unable to return to appropriate depths after they have been released and are frequently subject to predation.

Descending devices reduce terminal barotrauma occurrences by quickly sending the fish back to appropriate depths. These devices are offered by CRD free to the public with support from Yamaha and FishSmart, an initiative of the American Sportfishing Association. Participating anglers will be asked to complete a short, web-based survey in exchange for the descending devices. To receive a descending device, contact CRD’s Kathy Knowlton at 912.262.3122 or kathy.knowlton@dnr.ga.gov. Anglers are also encouraged to visit safmc.net/best-fishing-practices to learn more about available resources (e.g., videos of fish released with a descending device, how to use various types of devices, best practices to release fish).

Beginning July 15th, descending devices will be required on board and readily available for use on commercial, for-hire and private recreational vessels when targeting snapper-grouper species in federal waters in the South Atlantic. Click here or visit https://www.fisheries.noaa.gov/action/regulatory-amendment-29-gear-requirements-south-atlantic-snapper-grouper-species for more information.

For more information about CRD’s Marine Fisheries Section, or to learn more about how anglers can conserve marine fisheries for present and future generations, visit www.CoastalGaDNR.org.

Mobile unit brings health care to area residents

Sometimes just getting to the doctor is a hurdle, and Coastal Community Health Services is attempting to solve that problem. The health organization recently launched a mobile health clinic to bring health care to people in locations throughout Glynn and McIntosh counties, and at their workplaces as well.Set up just like a physician’s office, Barbara Meyers, founder and CEO of Coastal Community Health Services, said the mobile unit can deliver an important benefit to employers and employees alike through regularly scheduled visi...

Sometimes just getting to the doctor is a hurdle, and Coastal Community Health Services is attempting to solve that problem. The health organization recently launched a mobile health clinic to bring health care to people in locations throughout Glynn and McIntosh counties, and at their workplaces as well.

Set up just like a physician’s office, Barbara Meyers, founder and CEO of Coastal Community Health Services, said the mobile unit can deliver an important benefit to employers and employees alike through regularly scheduled visitors.

“Studies have proven that offering this benefit to employees helps reduce absenteeism caused by illness, and losing work hours due to the time spent traveling to and from doctors’ offices, labs and appointments,” she said. “Using the services of a mobile clinic with highly qualified medical providers can be less expensive than providing and staffing an in-house clinic.”

The mobile health clinic can provide anything a person might need if they went to their regular doctor.

“You’re seen by a nurse, nurse practitioner or actual doctor, and patients come to us for wellness visits and sick calls,” Meyers said. “We’ll be able to do some labs and diagnostic tests – blood tests, some urine tests, blood pressure, blood sugar.”

Fees are affordable, she said, and the mobile unit provides an added benefit for small businesses which perhaps don’t offer health insurance, and helps those employers take care of the healthcare needs of their employees. Also, by sponsoring wellness and early detection programs, silent health conditions like high blood pressure can be caught and treated early, before major damage is done.

Coastal Community Health Services accepts insurance, but fees for uninsured patients are based on income.

“They may end up paying only $30 to $40 for a doctor’s visit that often costs a lot more,” Meyers said. That’s also important for people who may have limited health insurance that doesn’t cover vision, dental or psychiatric care. “They can get help here. We are full-service healthcare.”

Coastal Community Health Services a full range of health services to meet the diverse needs of both Glynn and McIntosh counties. Its primary health care services function as a family medical practice with in-house labs and X-ray capability, Meyers said.

“We care for patients from infants to seniors,” she said. “Our approach features a prominent focus on wellness, prevention and treatment of everyday illness, as well as early detection and management of chronic conditions.”

There is a dental clinic on-site at the Glynn Place Mall location, which Meyers hopes will reopen soon after having been closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The practice also offers free and low-cost prescriptions for its patients, and offers vision care through local providers. Patients who need specialty services are referred to other practitioners. Coastal Community Health Services is not affiliated with Southeast Georgia Health System, but does have a collaboration with it.

Coastal Community Health Services also offers on-site behavioral health services – patients can have quick access to a psychiatric nurse practitioner when they need to be seen.

Meyers applied for the organization’s grant in 2013, and the doors opened in 2014. The purpose of the organization, she said, is to provide quality primary, dental, vision and behavioral health care for any resident of Glynn and McIntosh counties, particularly those without health insurance, and lower-income individuals and families.

That level of health care is a valuable resource in both urban and rural communities in the Golden Isles.

“ … We also truly care for our patients as individuals,” Meyers said. “Since we can treat the whole family, we get to know and love entire generations of our patients in Glynn and McIntosh counties.”

During the ongoing pandemic, the organization’s behavioral health care staff is available to help deal with the stress and challenges of the illness and associated economic upheaval.

“We can accept all insurance, and offer realistic payment plans for those without health insurance. No one is denied health care because of an inability to pay,” Meyers said. “We are a one-stop shop. We offer something for everyone.”

Breakout:

Coastal Community Health Services has three locations:

• Main clinic, 106 Shoppers Way, Brunswick, open 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays; 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Thursdays and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fridays.

• Perry Park, 2211 Bartow St., open 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays; 8 a.m. to 4:15 p.m. Tuesdays through Fridays.

• Shellman Bluff/McIntosh County, 6574 Shellman Bluff Road, Shellman Bluff, open 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. Mondays; 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Thursdays and 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fridays.

For more information or to make an appointment, call 912-275-8028 or visit www.CoastalCHS.org.

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